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Because we need to reclaim the word ‘feminism’. We need the word ‘feminism’ back real bad. When statistics come in saying only 29 per cent of American women would describe themselves as feminist - and only 42 per cent of British women - I used to think, What do you think feminism IS, ladies? What part of ‘liberation for women’ is not for you? Is it freedom to vote? The right not to be owned by the man you marry? The campaign for equal pay? ‘Vogue’ by Madonna? Jeans? Did all that good shit get on your nerves? Or were you just DRUNK AT THE TIME OF THE SURVEY?
... Caitlin Moran, How to be a Woman (via josielovesfirefly)
  2:42 pm, reblogged  by givingupthegun, [ 115 notes ]


On the broader issue, Stella Gilgur-Cooke of Forest Hills said she intentionally doesn’t buy princess items, but her 3-year-old daughter still knows all their names and what the dresses look like.

Ms. Gilgur-Cooke said her daughter asks her things like whether she’s pretty or ugly. And when she asked her daughter what she wants to be when she grows up, the toddler said, “Um, a teacher. A mommy. [Big pause.] What else can girls be?”

This despite the fact that her daughter has a female doctor, a working mother and a female vet for their cats. She has “already absorbed what we like to think of as antiquated messages about women’s abilities,” Ms. Gilgur-Cooke said.

... this excerpt from this Wall Street Journal article about the LEGO Friends backlash pretty much says it all.  (via sparkamovement)
tagged: [feminism]
  5:14 pm, reblogged  by givingupthegun, [ 144 notes ]


I want to live in a world where little girls are not pinkified, but where little girls who like pink are not punished for it, either. We can certainly talk about the social pressures surrounding gender roles, and the concerns that people have when they see girls and young women who appear to be forced into performances of femininity by the society around them but let‘s stop acting like they have no agency and free will. Let‘s stop acting like women who choose to be feminine are somehow colluders, betraying the movement, bamboozled into thinking that they want to be feminine. Let‘s stop denying women their own autonomy by telling them that their expressions of femininity are bad and wrong
...

s.e. smith, cosmoqueer #1

(via elliottmarshal)

…i am dying of happiness.

(via femmesandfamily)

Demonizing femininity is just another way of saying masculinity is better, which is, surprise, sexist.

(via reelaroundthefountain)

(Source: cosmoqueer)

  6:07 pm, reblogged  by givingupthegun, [ 3,901 notes ]


What puzzles me is that people who are willing to slut-bomb all over the place, or riddle a sentence with rape, back the fuck away from fuck. Somehow it sits at the top of the expletive hierarchy, the biggest and baddest of them all that still remains marginally socially acceptable.
  2:08 pm, by givingupthegun


laurennmcc:

Are we equals, 007?

Daniel Craig And Judi Dench: Are We Equals?

March is Women’s History Month and tomorrow is the centenary of International Women’s Day. In honor of that day, EQUALS, a partnership of leading charities brought together by Annie Lennox to celebrate the centenary of International Women’s Day, had filmmaker Sam Taylor Wood produce the sobering video above. Daniel Craig, AKA James Bond, appears in drag while Judi Dench does a voice over highlighting the many inequities faced by women. “We’re equals, aren’t we, double 0 seven?” she asks. “Yet it is 2011 and a man is still likely to earn more money than a women, even for the same job.” But, she continued, “It’s not just about money and power. …one in four are victims of domestic violence.” Midway through the video, Dench inquires pointedly: “For someone with such a fondness for women, I wonder if you’ve ever considered what it might be like to be one?”

[We Are Equals via Vulture]

  3:41 pm, reblogged  by givingupthegun, [ 583 notes ]


Odd Future, Hip-Hop, Misogyny, and the Internet | The Hairpin

While it’s true exaggerated characters can provide entertainment, it  seems like if you’re going to give a pass to this sort of thing, you  have to make sure you’re completely objective and open about all of the  media you consume, not just the things that happen to not offend you.  Conversely, if you’re going to criticize Tyler, make sure you’re holding  your other entertainment figures to the same standard. (And if you’re  going to criticize Tyler, make sure there’s never been an occasion when  you’ve been cool with Eminem and his music, because, well, as I said  above, Eminem’s probably been more detrimental to women — if not  directly, then at least by way of influence — than some random some kid  who’s sort of popular on the internet.)
Or: It’s tricky to have vehement arguments about a subjective topic!
As far as how Charlie Sheen fits into all of this, and who’s “worse,”  it seems silly that we can’t allow both of them to be detrimental to  our societies in their own special ways. On one hand, praising Charlie  Sheen for his whole “whatever” attitude, as is currently popular, seems  icky considering his history of domestic abuse — and this argument was  made more articulately by the much smarter Anna Holmes today in a Times piece that does not involve the word icky.  And on the other hand Tyler’s misogynystic and at times rapey persona  is probably influencing younger, dumber kids who may not know that it’s  all an act (and, for what it’s worth, I’m not completely dumb or  particularly young, and until I did some serious digging, I had no idea  it was an act). And regardless of whether or not you like Odd Future,  you can probably agree that that’s not completely awesome.

I’m not going to say that everyone I like is perfect in terms of the way they address social issues, but considering that Odd Future are most frequently compared to Eminem and Insane Clown Posse…

Odd Future, Hip-Hop, Misogyny, and the Internet | The Hairpin

While it’s true exaggerated characters can provide entertainment, it seems like if you’re going to give a pass to this sort of thing, you have to make sure you’re completely objective and open about all of the media you consume, not just the things that happen to not offend you. Conversely, if you’re going to criticize Tyler, make sure you’re holding your other entertainment figures to the same standard. (And if you’re going to criticize Tyler, make sure there’s never been an occasion when you’ve been cool with Eminem and his music, because, well, as I said above, Eminem’s probably been more detrimental to women — if not directly, then at least by way of influence — than some random some kid who’s sort of popular on the internet.)

Or: It’s tricky to have vehement arguments about a subjective topic!

As far as how Charlie Sheen fits into all of this, and who’s “worse,” it seems silly that we can’t allow both of them to be detrimental to our societies in their own special ways. On one hand, praising Charlie Sheen for his whole “whatever” attitude, as is currently popular, seems icky considering his history of domestic abuse — and this argument was made more articulately by the much smarter Anna Holmes today in a Times piece that does not involve the word icky. And on the other hand Tyler’s misogynystic and at times rapey persona is probably influencing younger, dumber kids who may not know that it’s all an act (and, for what it’s worth, I’m not completely dumb or particularly young, and until I did some serious digging, I had no idea it was an act). And regardless of whether or not you like Odd Future, you can probably agree that that’s not completely awesome.

I’m not going to say that everyone I like is perfect in terms of the way they address social issues, but considering that Odd Future are most frequently compared to Eminem and Insane Clown Posse…

  7:51 pm, by givingupthegun


talbots:

goddamnpotterhead | sadydoyle:

Let us explain, as I have done, many times, whilst drunk:

Over here, we have Taylor Swift. She is fulfilling one of the fucked-up Acceptable Woman archetypes: Permanent girl-child, weirdly virginal no matter how many famous dudes she dates and writes songs about dating, white-dress-clad, sort of a permanent bride waiting for her lifelong heterosexual marriage which is the only thing you can really envision for her, Has A Lot Of Feelings but saves the really venomous ones for (a) girls whose boyfriends she wants to steal, (b) girls who steal her boyfriends, and (c) occasionally boyfriends. Depoliticized, only ever speaks about private concerns, anti-feminist or a-feminist, a giant child, strangely impossible to sexualize (even when she’s talking about “things that [another girl] does on the mattress,” she sounds like a sixth-grader who’s not quite clear on what Mattress Things consist of, but knows they’re DIRTY and girls who do them are GROSS). Acceptable, culturally, for these reasons.

AND OVER HERE, on the OTHER END of the spectrum, we have Ke$ha. Who, yes, looks exactly like Taylor Swift in the process of incurring the world’s worst hangover. Permanently offensive, permanently blitzed, always as loud and rude and inappropriate as she can possibly be at all times, frankly and hugely and inappropriately sexual, confrontational, vulgar, mean, covered in glitter and puke and possibly her own urine, out for attention and doesn’t care who knows it: Ke$ha occupies the whore/bad girl end of the Girl Spectrum, on which Taylor Swift is of course the virgin/good girl at the opposite end. You would think the whore/bad girl would be less acceptable, in the grand scheme of things, but it’s not true: She’s still depoliticized and anti-feminist or a-feminist, she still reserves her hostilities for other girls and the disappointing boys she’s dated, so we have room for her. If only because we need someone to publicly vilify and disassociate ourselves from. And I have a sneaky love for this archetype, because I spent some time occupying it myself in my less mature years, but yes, let’s be frank, Ke$ha is freaking awful. Much like (IMO! IMO!) Taylor Swift.

BUT THEN WE HAVE KATY PERRY. AND I HATE HER SO MUCH MORE THAN EITHER OF THOSE WOMEN, YOU GUYS, I DON’T KNOW HER BUT I JUST CANNOT STAND HER PUBLIC PERSONA OR MUSIC, MY DISLIKE IS SO EXTREME.

Because the Taylor Swift act is an act. The Ke$ha act is an act. We know these women to be actresses, each playing to a specific archetype of womanhood, with some major collaboration by the media which wants to construe them as one or the other ANYWAY.

But right here, not even in the middle but somehow bilocating herself to both ends of the spectrum while occupying neither, we have Katy Fucking Perry AND I CAN’T STAND IT. She is trying to occupy BOTH of these FUCKING AWFUL AND REGRESSIVE ARCHETYPES. She shows up talking about your cock and shooting whipped cream out of her tits, and then she talks about how marriage is super-important to her and she “tamed” her husband out of non-monogamy. She kissed a girl, and she liked it, but ultimately it’s very important that her boyfriend don’t mind it, because he has veto power on her sexuality. She wants to see your cock, but not really, cocks are for heterosexual monogamous marriage and she has one of those. She wants to be a bad girl who’s also a good girl, a Whore who’s also a Madonna, and it’s not about complexity, DON’T SAY IT’S ABOUT COMPLEXITY, it’s the exact same thing sex-positive AND older-school feminists have been complaining about FOREVER.

Yeah. That thing where we tell girls to be “sexy, but not sexual?” That thing where we frame female sexuality EXPLICITLY as a performance for men, not an experience within your own body that you get to define? That thing where we codify performing for men as “rebellion,” which strangely makes your “rebellion” (HA) (UGH) dependent on how much you please men, and once more divorces you from your own complex human sexuality in favor of making it an externally-defined show which you have to create in order to please as many men as possible? But you can’t ACTUALLY be having a lot of non-monogamous sex, so you have to be as constantly, overtly, “rebelliously” sexy as possible WHILE ALSO FINDING A HUSBAND AND “TAMING” HIM TO RESPECT THE INSTITUTION OF MARRIAGE WHICH IS SOOOOOOOO IMPORTANT TO YOU???????

THAT IS KATY PERRY.

STOP SAYING NICE THINGS ABOUT HER.

SHE IS AN EXAMPLE OF EVERYTHING WRONG ABOUT THE PRESSURES ON WOMEN IN THIS OUR CURRENT ERA.

SHE JUST IS.

SHE’S AWFUL.

STOP.

  6:07 pm, reblogged  by givingupthegun, [ 1,849 notes ]


agrammar:

screwrocknroll:

sadydoyle:

That thing where we tell girls to be “sexy, but not sexual?” … THAT IS KATY PERRY. STOP SAYING NICE THINGS ABOUT HER. SHE IS AN EXAMPLE OF EVERYTHING WRONG ABOUT THE PRESSURES ON WOMEN IN THIS OUR CURRENT ERA.

Folks who don’t like Perry — their rhetoric tends to be fulminating and furious, in much the way Sady Doyle’s is above — are all agreed on one thing: she’s a bad woman. Whether it’s because she has too much sex, or not enough, or has sex wrong, what she does is definitely a Bad Thing for a woman to be doing. 

By comparison, the folks who like what Perry does are discovering far more interesting things in her music:

Try Clem Bastow:

Or Nitsuh Abebe:

^^ This conversation is edited all to hell, so if you want to read anyone’s full point, you should click through.

I just wanted to note that I am a long-time fan of the school of music criticism where the main goal is just to describe and explain the music, what it is and what it does, in a way that allows people to make their own judgments about it. And on that level, I actually don’t think the things I see in Katy Perry and the things Sady sees in her are particularly different. When I wrote that Perry seems to draw a line between Girls Gone Wild videos and apple pie, well … that’s meant to acknowledge and point toward exactly the kind of conclusion Sady comes to — that maybe that’s a really terrible thing!

It’s certainly possible to find what Perry does aesthetically interesting, even lovable; I think she pulls together a bunch of signifiers in a way that can be sort of cartoonishly striking, even campily gorgeous. But I don’t think the signifiers I’m talking about are really different from the ones Sady’s describing. Because this is what happens when you create some cartoon reconciliation of wholesomeness and sleaze and dreamy Americana and eye-batting pin-up innocence and party-girl performative sexiness and whatnot — you are in fact going to wind up with some weird virgin/whore stuff that’s not very good for the world.

And either end of that stick strikes me as worth describing. (Being boring, I like to describe the middle of the stick and let people follow it in whichever direction they think is right.)

Bold mine.

  9:47 am, reblogged  by givingupthegun, [ 1,849 notes ]


Minaj is a master of playing to the male gaze while disrupting certain expectations as a way to assert her artistic individuality. So it was not surprising, but still somewhat jarring that at the height of Nicki’s dominance of the track, the person who uploaded the YouTube video inserts a little note that pops up saying “WHAT a ASSSSSS!”

  3:21 pm, by givingupthegun, [ 2 notes ]


People are afraid to call themselves feminists…. That word has used too much in just one way, which is, like, if you’re a feminist, you’re an angry person and you hate me. People don’t use the word enough. You read a lot of interviews with girls who are reluctant to call themselves feminists and I wonder, why is that a bad word? Why is that considered wrong, to be a feminist? It’s weird not to be a feminist, I think. On the other hand, of course, it would be better if we didn’t have to put a label on it.
... Robyn on feminism (via drumbeatdrop)
  4:41 pm, by givingupthegun


That’s how sex is presented to boys - it’s not intimacy; it’s not the loving, egalitarian [part] that we get something out of, it’s something we do to the other. We raise women to survive in a rape culture, because we raise women to know these things. We do nothing to talk to men about not raping. But we do talk to women about how to protect themselves, which is further why we place the blame on women when something happens. ‘Well didn’t you know not to do that? Didn’t you know not to wear that dress? Or didn’t you know not to walk down that street at that hour of the night?’
...

Feminist Don McPherson, on rape culture and educating boys to not rape

(via notyourheart)

tagged: [feminism]
  2:55 pm, reblogged  by givingupthegun, [ 7,756 notes ]


akraken:

pockyfox:

 “Feminism expects a man to be ethical, emotionally present, and accountable to his values in his actions with women — as well as with other men. Feminism loves men enough to expect them to act more honorably and actually believes them capable of doing so.” -Michael S. Kimmel
(via)

this quote 

akraken:

pockyfox:

“Feminism expects a man to be ethical, emotionally present, and accountable to his values in his actions with women — as well as with other men. Feminism loves men enough to expect them to act more honorably and actually believes them capable of doing so.” -Michael S. Kimmel

(via)

this quote 

(Source: demonsandsuch)

tagged: [feminism]
  4:42 pm, reblogged  by givingupthegun, [ 3,018 notes ]


Niqabitch secoue Paris (by NiqaBitch)

Mettre une simple burqa aurait été trop simple. Alors on s’est posé la question : comment réagiraient les autorités face à des femmes portant une burqa ET un minishort ?

On ne cherchait pas à attaquer ou à dégrader l’image des intégristes musulmans -chacun son trip. Mais plutôt à interpeller les élus de la République qui sont allés au bout du vote de cette loi que l’on estime être largement anticonstitutionnelle… Et puis finalement, le LOL c’est bien pour dénoncer non ?

  8:58 pm, by givingupthegun, [ 2 notes ]


(Source: milhoose)

tagged: [feminism]
  5:18 pm, reblogged  by givingupthegun, [ 8 notes ]


I think this article has some good things to say, particularly the second paragraph.  Wanting to go into entertainment journalism, I’ve thought a lot about how much I can be taken seriously.  It’s something I know I need to be conscious of.  Certainly, there are things in (female) music fanship that are quite frankly over the top and embarrassing, but they don’t represent the whole.  I feel guilty for accidentally letting a “Damn, that one guy is such a babe” slip out in casual conversation, but people like John Sellers can get away with extended digressions as to whether or not Kim Deal is hot and freely admit to trying to look up Elastica’s skirts in the 90s—in a properly published book.

  4:36 pm, by givingupthegun